KELP


KELP: “Protector from the Sea”

Heart Disease, Infection Prevention, Toxic Heavy Metals

Also Known As: Arame, Bladder Fucus, Bladderwrack, Cutweed, Fucus, Hijiki, Kombu, Sea Vegetables; in Japan, Seawrack and Wakame

HISTORY:

Kelp is a great source for iodine and is also used to treat goiters. A few modern herbalists recommend it for the thyroid. Kelp is a seaweed that grows as high as 200 feet in North America, Japan and Europe. Early fishermen wrapped and baked fish with it.

PREPARATION:

Kelp is said to have an unpleasant taste. To take advantage of the goodness of kelp, tablets are the way to go. If you decide to do an infusion, add 2 to 3 teaspoons of dried powder per cut of boiling water and steep for 10 minutes. Drink no more than 3 cups a day.

USE: (Grow Your Own)

Buy kelp from commercial sources. It grows in cold water off the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of North America. When it is fresh, it has a strong odor, but baking it will deodorize the odor. If you are adventurous, try some kelp recipes from a Japanese cookbook or develop a taste for sushi, which contains a considerable amount of kelp.

SAFETY:

The Food and Drug Administration includes kelp on the list as being generally safe.